Research reveals damaging impact of witnessing domestic violence

Research reveals damaging impact of witnessing domestic violence

Figures released by the NSPCC highlight the long-term impact of domestic violence on children.

Children who witness domestic violence are four times more likely to turn violent themselves, according to research by the NSPCC.

They are also four times more likely to carry a weapon, three times more likely to take drugs, steal or bully and twice as likely to be excluded from school than children from non-violent homes.

The findings, based on a survey of more than 6,000 children, young people and carers, highlight the impact of domestic violence on children.

Even five to 10 year-olds from violent or abusive homes are two to four times more likely to attack or bully other children, the research revealed.

The survey also found that children who grow up in violent homes are five times as likely to run away from home than their peers.

The charity is now calling on children’s services and adults’ services to work more closely when violence in the home is reported. This would ensure the needs of the whole family are met.

NSPCC chief Andrew Flanagan said the research shows that the damaging impact of family violence on children’s behaviour is “immense”.

“It shows a clear link between witnessing family violence at a young age and serious behavioural problems in later life. This is something we have always known but these figures give us strong new evidence of a correlation.

“So we welcome the government’s focus on early intervention and also their attempts to tackle ‘troubled families’. But by the time a child is in their early teens the damage can already be done and behaviour can spiral out of control.

“We must intervene early in families where violence occurs and, crucially, we must provide opportunities for therapy for children who have been harmed by this abuse,” he said.

Schools to be notified by phone the afternoon before Ofsted check

Schools to be notified by phone the afternoon before Ofsted check

Ofsted has rubberstamped plans to reduce the amount of notice given to schools ahead of an inspection from September this year.

Following a consultation into wider changes to schools inspections, the watchdog confirmed that inspectors would move to a system whereby they notify schools by phone the afternoon before a check is due to take place.

Ofsted had proposed conducting school inspections without any notice at all, but decided to amend the plans, since head teachers

NSPCC survey finds violence in the home increases risk of antisocial behaviour in children

NSPCC survey finds violence in the home increases risk of antisocial behaviour in children

Children who witness family violence are more likely to seriously harm another person, run away from home, be excluded from school or carry a weapon, according to a survey by the NSPCC.

The research, which questioned more than 6,000 children, young people and carers in England, found that children who see violence between their parents or other family members are four times as likely as their peers to carry a knife or hurt someone.

They are also three times more likely to be involved in a range of antisocial behaviour such as bullying, stealing or vandalism and twice as likely to be excluded from school.

Andrew Flanagan, chief executive of the NSPCC, said: “This research is particularly timely with the government’s focus on

Revised standards for Early Years Professional Status

Revised standards for Early Years Professional Status

Following a review, the Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) standards have been revised.

The standards, originally launched in 2007, are the basis for the assessment and accreditation for the award of EYPS and set out the national expectations for anyone wishing to gain the status.

Since its launch, over 9,700 Early Years Professionals have successfully achieved EYPS and are working across England, making a positive difference to children’s learning and development every day.

The revised EYPS standards have been developed taking into account policy development, consultation with the early years sector including Early Years Professionals and training providers, and advice from an external reference group.

The proposed standards have been strengthened, particularly around leadership, supporting children

Children in England has published a report detailing forthcoming changes to Safeguarding as a result of Munro and the upcoming consultation on a new Working Together.

Children in England has published a report, aimed at the voluntary and community sectors, detailing forthcoming changes to Safeguarding as a result
of Munro and the upcoming consultation on a new Working Together. Key points include: the importance of early and timely help, an increase in autonomy and professional responsibility, and the importance of evidencing the difference work makes to children’s lives.
Source: More for children: Munro and its implications for the VCS. (PDF) 24 May 2012

Cafcass has published data showing local variations in the number of care applications in England.

Cafcass has published data showing local variations in the number of care applications in England. Findings include: fourteen local authorities showed a net decrease in the number of applications per 10,000 children over the five years from 2007-08 to 2011-12 while in 2011-12, 53 local authorities experienced either a decrease or no change in the application rate.
Source: Cafcass 25 May 2012
Further information:
BBC Online 25 May 2012

450 families with dependent children had been housed in bed and breakfasts in England

Housing Minister Grant Shapps has revealed that at the end of December 2011 450 families with dependent children had been housed in bed and breakfasts in England for more than six weeks. The figure, which was released following a parliamentary question by Labour shadow minister for young people Karen Buck, is triple that of December 2010.
Source: Hansard 23 May 2012
Further information:
Children & Young People Now 25 May 2012

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